Quotes Wall: Albert Camus


 

I knew a man who gave twenty years of his life to a scatterbrained woman, sacrificing everything to her, his friendships, his work, the very respectability of his life and who one evening recognized that he had never loved her. He had been bored, thats all, bored like most people. Hence he had made himself out of whole cloth a life full of complications and drama. Something must happen and that explains most human commitments. Something must happen even loveless slavery, even war or death. 

 

The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion.

 

We don’t have the time to completely be ourselves. We only have the room to be happy.

 

Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present.

 

The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.

 

People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves.

 

Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.

 

At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman.

 

Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth.

 

– quotes by Albert Camus

 


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Quotes Wall: Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach


 

Heaven is not a place, and it is not a time. Heaven is being perfect. -And that isn’t flying a thousand miles an hour, or a million, or flying at the speed of light. Because any number is a limit, and perfection doesn’t have limits. Perfect speed, my son, is being there.

 

Don’t believe what your eyes are telling you. All they show is limitation. Look with your understanding. Find out what you already know and you will see the way to fly.

 

“Your whole body, from wingtip to wingtip,” Jonathan would say, other times, “is nothing more than your thought itself, in a form you can see. Break the chains of your thought, and you break the chains of your body, too.”

 

He was not bone and feather but a perfect idea of freedom and flight, limited by nothing at all.

 

You have the freedom to be yourself, your true self, here and now, and nothing can stand in your way.

 

To fly as fast as thought, to anywhere that is, you must begin by knowing that you have already arrived.

 

You have to practice and see the real gull, the good in every one of them, and to help them see it in themselves.
That’s what I mean by love.

 

Overcome space, and all we have left is Here.
Overcome time, and all we have left is Now.

 

We choose our next world through what we learn in this one. Learn nothing, and the next world is the same as this one, all the same limitations and lead weights to overcome.

 

– quotes from “Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach

 


Quotes Wall: Emily Dickinson


 

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you – Nobody – Too?
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! they’d advertise – you know!

How dreary – to be – Somebody!
How public – like a Frog –
To tell one’s name – the livelong June –
To an admiring Bog!

 

He who weigheth – While the Rest –
Expend their furthest pound –
Of this Man – I am wary –
I fear that He is Grand

 

Assent – and you are sane –
Demur – you’re straightway dangerous –
And handled with a Chain

 

That I did always love
I bring thee Proof
That till I loved
I never lived – Enough –

That I shall love alway –
I argue thee
That love is life –
And life hath Immortality

 

Surrender – is a sort unknown 

 

‘Tis not that Dying hurts us so –
‘This Living – hurts us more

 

The Bravest – grope a little –
And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead –
But as they learn to see

Either the Darkness alters –
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight –
And Life steps almost straight.

 

I can wade Grief –
Whole Pools of it –
I’m used to that –
But the least push of Joy
Breaks up my feet –
And I tip – drunken

 

Wild Nights – Wild Nights!
Were I with thee
Wild Nights should be
Our luxury!

 

Artist – who drew me so –
Must tell!

 

– quotes from poems by Emily Dickinson

 


 

Carmilla: who precedes Dracula

Carmilla_SheridanLeFanu

Carmilla is a gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu from 1872, before Stoker’s Dracula saw the light.

Laura lives in Styria, she’s the nineteen girl who tells the story. She lives with her father in an isolated castle when Carmilla becomes a part of their lives.

Carmilla looks like a sweet, shy and a little weird girl, pale complexion and weak constitution, but she actually is a vampire. It’s implied that Laura is her next victim, but Carmilla also shows love for the girl and draws out her death instead of killing her in a few days.

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Viola di Mare: Italian LGBT movie

 

 Surprise surprise! We have an original Italian lesbian movie! Viola di mare (Purple sea) is a love story between two women in sexist times, in a land (Sicily) where is hard to be different.

 Sara and Angela are childhood friends, but it’s when Sara comes back after years away that they actually fall in love. That is when the sparkle finally gives birth to a fire and they cannot run from those feelings.

 But people don’t forgive being weird, women have to marry men and carry children, that is their worth, that is their only purpose. And so one of them has to change, one of them has to look like a man, so that they can be together.

 Angela dies, a delicate boy taking her place in Sara’s arms.

 Viola di mare is a story of no easy love, it’s a story of happiness and pain, grief and hiding. It’s the story of a lesbian couple from the south in the 19th Century.

 It’s not among my favourite LGBT movies, but it’s a nice one. There aren’t many Italian LGBT movies and this is among the good ones. 

Faking It: how average shows should be

 Faking It is not what you can call a great and deep TV show, but in its simplicity and even ordinariness it obtains something very few have. It is an average show, one like all the others you may catch on TV switching channels, but it’s a modern, more open-minded version of those silly shows.

 The topic through the seasons is teenage life, the daily drama of grown-up kids and their parents, just a common, overused, trivial topic we have seen millions of time on TV. And yet, the show comes as an amused breath of fresh air.

 It’s a comical show, exaggerated in its drama, ridiculous in most of its dynamics, and yet it also manages to offer some deep considerations. It can be watched as a light show to pass time, or it can be watched more carefully, paying attention to the messages behind the comical exaggerations of teenage drama. 

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Quotes Wall: Leaves of grass by Walt Whitman Part 2


 

To court destruction with taunts, with invitations!
To ascend, to leap to the heavens of the love indicated to
me!
To rise thither with my inebriate soul!
To be lost if it must be so!
To feed the remainder of life with one hour of fulness
and freedom!
With one brief hour of madness and joy.

 

Darest thou now O soul,
Walk out with me toward the unknown region,
Where neither ground is for the feet nor any path to
follow?
[…]
All waits undream’d of in that region, that inaccessible
land.

 

I think there is no unreturn’d love, the pay is
certain one way or another,
(I loved a certain person ardently and my love was not return’d,
Yet out of that I have written these songs.)

 

Now we have met, we have look’d, we are safe,
Return in peace to the ocean my love,
I too am a part of that ocean my love, we are not so much
separated

 

O shades of night – O moody, tearful night!

 

The Night follows close with millions of suns, and sleep
and restoring darkness.

 

The question, O me! so sad, recurring – What good amid
these, O me, O life?
answer
That you are here – that life exists and identity,
That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute
a verse.

 

O you fables spurning the known, eluding the hold of
the known, mounting to heaven!
You lofty and dazzling towers, pinnacled, red as roses,
burnish’d with gold!
Towers of fables immortal fashion’d from mortal
dreams!
You too I welcome and fully the same as the rest!
You too with joy I sing.

 

Proud music of the storm

 

I am the Poem of Earth, said the voice of the rain

 

– quotes from “Leaves of grass” by Walt Whitman